Three Attorney General’s Office (FGR) Agents Murdered in Guanajuato

“MX” for Borderland Beat

The victims were handcuffed, tortured, and killed with a bullet to their heads. 

Three agents from Mexico’s Attorney General’s Office (FGR) were killed and found dead inside a van on highway connecting Guanajuato City to Juventino Rosas.

“This happened to us for extortion”, the assassins wrote on the vehicle’s windows. No criminal group has claimed responsibility for this attack.

Initially, the identity of the three agents were not released to the press, but investigators were able to confirm them because they were carrying their work ID cards. According to local media reports, the victims were: Alberto Robert García, José Antonio Gutiérrez Juárez, and Héctor Santana González.

It was reported that the authorities took more than two hours to arrive at the scene because there is poor telephone signal and the community is difficult to access by road.

The area was cordoned off by municipal police officers while staff from the Guanajuato State Attorney General’s Office carried out the corresponding procedures. The corpses were sent to the forensic offices for an autopsy to determine their cause of death.


WARNING – Graphic Images Below

Background

At the end of January, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) reported that Guanajuato has the highest homicide rate in the country. For this reason, he dispatched 5,000 elements of the National Guard to the state.

Of the 2,325 murders that were committed during January 2021 throughout Mexico, 250 occurred in Guanajuato, representing 10% of the total. According to the National Search Commission, there are more than 2,500 missing persons in Guanajuato. Most of these disappearances occurred since 2016.

As reported by Borderland Beat, Guanajuato has increased a rise in homicides since the August 2020 capture of the local Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel (CSRL) leader José Antonio Yepez Ortiz (‘El Marro’). The rival Jalisco New Generation Cartel (CJNG) also operates in this region.

Sources: Proceso; Reforma; Excelsior; El Universal; Borderland Beat archives